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Glitches

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I love glitches.

A glitch is a short-lived fault in a system. It is often used to describe a transient fault that corrects itself, and is therefore difficult to troubleshoot.

I tend to play video games very differently than a lot of people, and with the amount I play these games, I unintentionally find what turns out to be really fun and sometimes frustrating holes and glitches.

Years ago, while first playing the game Everquest, I became stuck in the terrain, unable to move, and then fell through the terrain.

It’s happened to others, and here’s a screen capture of something similar to what I saw:

mdfall000[1]

Glitches are tells. As a programmer, they provided me a great deal of information on how an environment was constructed.

When I am in the world as another programmer created, I am limited to what they choose to let me see. But the moment a glitch occurs, it is a priceless moment that provides me those ‘aha’ moments, where I find myself marveling MORE at the world they have created for me than it does break the illusion.

It’s like the first time I went to Universal Studios in Hollywood and saw the real cinematics and special effects, done old school style….

Finding even computer game glitches, firsthand is that fun to me.

Back when Everquest first came out, there was a glitch I discovered where I could kill 4 mobs at the same time because developers had neglected to put collision detection on the mobs. This allowed me to gain experience extremely rapidly and level up extremely fast.

The developers decided to ‘keep this glitch in’ as it made the game more fun for those who played classes who could do what I did.

Worlds of Warcraft refused to allow trade between the two major in game factions – the Horde and the Alliance.

But there is a glitch that persists to this day – and you can mail things to your other characters in the other faction if you went to a neutral city such as Gadgetzan and used the mail there rather than an Alliance or Horde city.

So all I had to do was level one character up rapidly on a new server, and then with their substantially higher income at the higher level, I could then supply the best equipment and finances to my other characters on both sides which accelerated the level gaining.

At one time I had 8 of the highest level characters in the game because of this.

The glitches I find are discovered often because of tedium. Games often have a repetitive nature about them, much like life, and as interest wanes in a game, much like life, glitches often present themselves often by sheer coincidence. But in the absence of glitches… Sometimes other behavior unfolds.


 

What I experienced in the desert that day back in August of 2011.

Seeing a Terminator world.

Was a glitch.

It even self corrected to my astonishment as I watched.

More subtle forms of glitches occur all the time in real life.

I used to have the nasty habit of dismissing these glitches as flaws in my own perception.

Questioning my own memory.

Whether it was Deja Vu.

Or someone saying something one time and not long afterwards they assert they did not.

Or remembering a place being on the ‘left side of the road’ and when visited later it’s on the right.

Or remembering historical events differently than they are now written.

All various forms of glitches.

And no, it’s not your memory that’s at fault.

It’s glitches in the world around you.

Some artificially induced.

Others indicative of how nature herself works.

When I was traveling abroad for Prudential, I was sent to Singapore, Hong Kong, London, and Paris to prepare the international arms of the organizations for a new accounting and financial reporting system.

Among the necessities of my six month business trip, I had brought my XBOX 360 with me.

I was absolutely addicted to Oblivion on the XBOX 360, a game I’d played partially on the PC when it first came out, and wasn’t nearly as interested when it first came out.

I suppose it’s the first time I caught the most massive glitch I had ever found.

The game changed.

It expanded.

As I traveled. It quite literally grew in size and scope, without downloads.

It was the first real glaring glitch I had seen in this construct called reality.

It’s no wonder I was addicted to the game.

It CHANGED as I played it. It was literally ten times the size and scale of the game I had played on the PC.

It was magnificent.

I’m hoping that Worlds of Warcraft, as I play it on the Vanilla server, does the same thing.

And I have no doubt that Skyrim, when I play it again one of these days, will be the same way.

Sometimes we need glitches.

I love glitches.

A glitch is a short-lived fault in a system. It is often used to describe a transient fault that corrects itself, and is therefore difficult to troubleshoot.

I tend to play video games very differently than a lot of people, and with the amount I play these games, I unintentionally find what turns out to be really fun and sometimes frustrating holes and glitches.

Years ago, while first playing the game Everquest, I became stuck in the terrain, unable to move, and then fell through the terrain.

It’s happened to others, and here’s a screen capture of something similar to what I saw:

mdfall000[1]

Glitches are tells. As a programmer, they provided me a great deal of information on how an environment was constructed.

When I am in the world as another programmer created, I am limited to what they choose to let me see. But the moment a glitch occurs, it is a priceless moment that provides me those ‘aha’ moments, where I find myself marveling MORE at the world they have created for me than it does break the illusion.

It’s like the first time I went to Universal Studios in Hollywood and saw the real cinematics and special effects, done old school style….

Finding even computer game glitches, firsthand is that fun to me.

Back when Everquest first came out, there was a glitch I discovered where I could kill 4 mobs at the same time because developers had neglected to put collision detection on the mobs. This allowed me to gain experience extremely rapidly and level up extremely fast.

The developers decided to ‘keep this glitch in’ as it made the game more fun for those who played classes who could do what I did.

Worlds of Warcraft refused to allow trade between the two major in game factions – the Horde and the Alliance.

But there is a glitch that persists to this day – and you can mail things to your other characters in the other faction if you went to a neutral city such as Gadgetzan and used the mail there rather than an Alliance or Horde city.

So all I had to do was level one character up rapidly on a new server, and then with their substantially higher income at the higher level, I could then supply the best equipment and finances to my other characters on both sides which accelerated the level gaining.

At one time I had 8 of the highest level characters in the game because of this.

The glitches I find are discovered often because of tedium. Games often have a repetitive nature about them, much like life, and as interest wanes in a game, much like life, glitches often present themselves often by sheer coincidence. But in the absence of glitches… Sometimes other behavior unfolds.


What I experienced in the desert that day back in August of 2011.

Seeing a Terminator world.

Was a glitch.

It even self corrected to my astonishment as I watched.

More subtle forms of glitches occur all the time in real life.

I used to have the nasty habit of dismissing these glitches as flaws in my own perception.

Questioning my own memory.

Whether it was Deja Vu.

Or someone saying something one time and not long afterwards they assert they did not.

Or remembering a place being on the ‘left side of the road’ and when visited later it’s on the right.

Or remembering historical events differently than they are now written.

All various forms of glitches.

And no, it’s not your memory that’s at fault.

It’s glitches in the world around you.

Some artificially induced.

Others indicative of how nature herself works.

When I was traveling abroad for Prudential, I was sent to Singapore, Hong Kong, London, and Paris to prepare the international arms of the organizations for a new accounting and financial reporting system.

Among the necessities of my six month business trip, I had brought my XBOX 360 with me.

I was absolutely addicted to Oblivion on the XBOX 360, a game I’d played partially on the PC when it first came out, and wasn’t nearly as interested when it first came out.

I suppose it’s the first time I caught the most massive glitch I had ever found.

The game changed.

It expanded.

As I traveled. It quite literally grew in size and scope, without downloads.

It was the first real glaring glitch I had seen in this construct called reality.

It’s no wonder I was addicted to the game.

It CHANGED as I played it. It was literally ten times the size and scale of the game I had played on the PC.

It was magnificent.

I’m hoping that Worlds of Warcraft, as I play it on the Vanilla server, does the same thing.

And I have no doubt that Skyrim, when I play it again one of these days, will be the same way.

Sometimes I need glitches.

Even if they are programmed and intentional.

Discovering the false fronts like the ACME businesses in this world are half the fun of discovering the world around us.

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